Category Archives: Neonatal Loss Awareness

baby loss, grief

Post-Neonatal. Fight or Flight

When we walked out of the hospital after the death of our daughter – Post-neonatal death; I never expected to spend the years afterwards in what feels like a fight or flight mode. Nearly everywhere we turned there was nothing, and I have said this many, many times. I think I have repeated this, because I cannot get my head around how little support there is for babies who lived, then died, the ones who never came home.

Fitting In

I have searched for statistics, for facts for something for us to fit in. Yet there’s almost nothing. It is bloody lonely.

Where exactly is it we fit in? I know people can’t help it, because I guess babies who are older than 28 days are more than likely to live – or are they?

I feel as though I am on a losing battle, talking about her. Even if I screamed in my biggest voice, would I ever get listened to? I know I do in a way; because people tell me so. But in a way to make change, to make neonatal and post-neonatal losses heard, to make their statistics drop.

If I have to be a bereaved Mum I at least want to fit in, to feel less alone. Can you imagine what it feels like to be told that when your baby dies, there seems to be a cut off for support, because she was too old? Or that we were bumped off or down the list? To have a session where not only was it in the G.U.M clinic (sexual health), but the person listening wasn’t massively interested in talking about our loss; but had an opinion about falling pregnant again afterwards.

Breathe.

Awareness

I have so much I feel I want to achieve. I have let fear get in my way since 2012.

Our daughter was born due to HELLP syndrome, a severe form of Pre-Eclampsia, a condition that is quite clearly STILL under researched – When I say clearly I mean being told by two different midwives that you don’t get pre-eclampsia before 28 weeks, the second time being after the death of our daughter (she also stated that you don’t get it twice). It can kill.

I want to help. (There have been in talks about case studies).

I suffered Hyperemesis throughout each of my pregnancies, each getting worse the more babies I had. Another under supported condition, a condition that leads women to abort, commit suicide or die from malnutrition, (a contributing factor to the death of Charlotte Bronte). That and living with mental and health issues afterwards

I will help.

Melody died at 35 days old, she died from overwhelming sepsis. 35 days. Post-Neonatal Death.

She had a good chance of coming home, but she didn’t.

I want to help lower the mortality rates of these babies. I want to show their parents that they really do matter; to be recognised more.

I hoped by setting up Little Daffodils that I helped a little in making that step towards supporting people, making sure people are never left alone.

Post-Neonatal

There is so much I want to do, but have no idea where to begin. I want to change so much, the maternity services, the bereavement services. I would like throw the text books out of the windows and burn them, because no BODY is the same. Women and families should not be treated as such.

Tonight I feel a little angry at the world, and how cruel it is to feel essentially thrown out into the cold, when all we ever wanted was the warmth that we watched others have*.

I need to now figure out the next step.

But maybe when I feel less angry.

Ideas are welcome, links to places I can contact. I want to do more.

*I was lucky to have online forums, people slate the online community a lot, but if I hadn’t had them I honestly do not know where I would have been.

Thank you for reading.

Post-Neonatal awareness

Clear and Let Go

little daffodils

Together For Yellow – Marisa’s Story

12 Days – That Is All I Got

(By no means am I trying to discredit miscarriages or stillbirths.)

My loss matters too.

My son was not a miscarriage.

My son was not a stillbirth.

My son was a neonatal death.

My son lived for 12 days.

My son died in my arms.

My son should be here.

My son is gone due to medical error. I can’t believe I finally said it and wrote it.

Medical error.

Here is his story. Here is how my son became a statistic for neonatal death.

 

The year – 2010.

The emotions/ feelings – joy, happiness, love.

We were expecting our first child. A boy. A son we named Drake.

We did everything first time parents do; we enjoyed every moment of the pregnancy, we imagined which one of us he would look like, we had baby showers, we painted his room, we decorated his room, we went to every appointment together with our group of doctors, we told the doctors any concerns we had (such as my high pain tolerance and the chance of having fast labor – family history), we looked forward to seeing our son, holding our son, loving our son.

At 38 weeks pregnant that all that changed. At 38 weeks, I went in for my normal weekly appointment. At 38 weeks, we found out our son was in the Frank Breech position. At 38 weeks, I was scheduled for my C-section for 4 days before my due date. At 38 weeks I still trusted my group of doctors.

At 39 weeks, 2 days – I went into labor at home in the early morning hours. We timed my contractions for 20 minutes and upon realizing they were less than 5 minutes apart, we called the doctor’s office and spoke with the nurse who said she would have the doctor call me (the same doctor on-call was the one who was to be doing my C-section in 2 days’ time).

My biggest mistake.

The doctor called, listened to what we said and decided that we should continue to monitor my contractions for another hour. Well as new parents, we listened. The biggest mistake ever because you see – 45 minutes into that hour my water broke and my son’s feet came out. (During this time, we called the nurse to have the doctor call us and we never got a return call until several hours later.)

Naturally once his feet came out, our next call was to 911, by the time they arrived my contractions (with no help from me) had pushed him out to his ribcage. The EMTs decided to try and help us finish delivering him on our bathroom floor – so we got the rest of his chest and his shoulders out. We could not get my son’s head out, so we were loaded on a gurney with his head still inside and taken to the hospital where with the ER doctor we finally got my son’s head out – but by now he was no longer breathing.

One of the EMTs was able to resuscitate him long enough to be placed on a ventilator.

Neonatal Unit

Within a couple of hours, he was transported to another hospital where there was a NICU. I had to stay at the hospital I was at, they finally released me after 15 hours and we made the 45-minute trip to see him.

You know your son is truly hurt when you walk into your son’s NICU room, surrounded by other babies, and the night head nurse tells you:

“Out of all the babies here in the NICU, your son is the worst one.”

Drake spent the next 12 days in that room. I could go on about the tests he had, the meetings with doctors we had, the talks with the nurses, the meeting with a local organ donation company (my husband and I are organ donations and we wanted information in case Drake did not make it).

No matter the tests, the meetings, the discussion – the tears, the anger, the silent screams; the end result would never change.

You see our son was

BRAIN DEAD.

Goodbye

The lack of oxygen he endured while he was stuck inside me caused brain damage, he would never breathe on his own, the doctors gave us 2 options:

  • Allow him to stay on the ventilator and allow his body to deteriorate and die.
  • Pull him off life support and allow him to die in our arms surrounded by love.

My husband and I talked for many hours – we made our decision out of love. Love for our son. We had no idea what pain he may have been experiencing.

We chose to say goodbye, to allow him to go, to relieve him of pain.

At 12 days, 12 hours old, we pulled Drake from life support. He lived another 4 hours before he finally passed away in my arms.

This was 7 years ago and I think about him every day.

 

Thank you to Marisa of Life by the Dreams for sharing Drake’s story.

neonatal

Baby Drake

little daffodils

Together For Yellow – Warren’s Story.

A Dad’s Perspective

As I try and raise as much awareness for Neonatal Loss, there is also another corner of the loss community which also gets forgotten, they are the Dads; so much focus goes towards the Mums.

I remember in the early days people would ask how I was but my husband was always asked to make the tea, or look after me and the children. He was hurting too.

Today’s installment is from a Dad

” I broke down and sobbed like I’ve never sobbed before to the point i nearly collapsed…”

I have included the link from his blog today, with his permission. Warren currently volunteers with UK charity Daddys With Angels.

I’d like to say thank you to Warren for sharing his story for this series. Please make sure you click the link.

Warren and Oliver.